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Fall and Spring Burndown Considerations

Fall and Spring Burndown Considerations published on No Comments on Fall and Spring Burndown Considerations

Fall and Spring Burndown Considerations

Josh Copes, Daniel Stephenson, and Donnie Miller

 

This time of year, especially when it is dry, brings about questions concerning a fall burndown application that contains a residual herbicide.  As with any field operation, fall burndown should provide a monetary benefit.  A lot of time and money is spent after harvest preparing fields for planting next spring.  Producers should realize that some fall-applied residual herbicides will provide control of most winter annuals which may result in excess soil and bed erosion.  So, you may be asking why apply a fall burndown?  If glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass along with some other winter annual weeds like henbit are an issue, research has shown that a fall residual herbicide application will provide good to excellent control the following spring.  The table below is a glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass weed control program developed by Mississippi State University weed scientists that LSU AgCenter weed scientists have adopted.  The fall-applied herbicides listed in the table will provide some control of henbit as well.

To combat glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass, many producers tank-mix Select Max/clethodim in their spring burndown.  Unfortunately, several phone calls were received this past spring concerning Italian ryegrass control failures following Select Max/clethodim application.  If controlling Italian ryegrass has been an issue and control failures with clethodim products has occurred, one of the Fall programs in the Table 1 should be utilized.

Regardless of the crop planted in the spring, the LSU AgCenter suggest applying a spring burndown 4 to 6 weeks prior to planting.  This gives plenty of time for weeds to die and break the “green bridge” and for soil residual herbicides, if applied, will keep the fields weed free until planting.  If planting corn, a soil residual herbicide applied in the fall may provide weed control until corn planting time.  Therefore, a fall residual herbicide can pay and keep the field weed free until planting.  If you plan on planting soybeans or cotton however, a fall-applied soil residual herbicide may not be the best choice.  In some years, soil residual herbicides can provide weed control up to 120 days.  If applied in early-December, you could expect good weed control until mid to late March.  We must remember that if a fall-applied residual herbicide is applied in December with the hopes of skipping a spring burndown, you are making a mistake.  Don’t assume a fall-applied residual herbicide will hold through spring.  Fields must be scouted.

When burning down fields near planting, herbicide selection and rate and spray coverage are very important to ensure complete control.  If mare’s-tail, henbit, cutleaf evening-primrose, and sowthistle are present, be sure to apply 2,4-D at 1 lb of acid equivalent per acre.  In many instances, when weed control is unsatisfactory from spring burndown, it is because 2,4-D rates that were too low or 2,4-D was not applied at all.

The main goal of any burndown operation is to be weed free at the time of planting.  Choice of fall or spring burndown will depend on what crop you intend to plant, if Italian ryegrass an issue, and if soil and bed erosion a problem.  Spending more money than necessary is a big concern when deciding on burndown.

 

Glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass control recommendations. Adopted from Mississippi State University.

 Crop Fall Winter Spring
Corn Dual Magnum @ 1.33 pt/A or Zidua @ 2.5 oz/A double disk Select Max @ 12-16 oz/A or equivalent rate of 2 lb clethodim formulation Paraquat @ 0.75-1.0 lb of a.i. or two applications 10-14 days apart
Cotton Dual Magnum @ 1.33 pt/A or

trifluralin @ 3 pt/A or double disk

Select Max @ 12-16 oz/A or equivalent rate of 2 lb clethodim formulation Paraquat @ 0.75-1.0 lb of a.i. or two applications 10-14 days apart
Soybean Dual Magnum @ 1.33 pt/A or

Boundary @ 2 pt/A or trifluralin @ 3 pt/A or double disk

Select Max @ 12-16 oz/A or equivalent rate of 2 lb clethodim formulation Paraquat @ 0.75-1.0 lb of a.i. or two applications 10-14 days apart
Rice Command @ 2 pt/A or double disk Select Max @ 12-16 oz/A or equivalent rate of 2 lb clethodim formulation Paraquat @ 0.75-1.0 lb of a.i. or two applications 10-14 days apart

http://mafes.msstate.edu/publications/information-sheets/i1359.pdf

 

Please feel free to contact us with any concerns or questions.

 

Josh Copes

Cell: 318-334-0401

Office: 318-766-4607

jcopes@agcenter.lsu.edu

 

Donnie Miller

Cell: 318-334-0401

Office: 318-766-4607

dmiller@agcenter.lsu.edu

 

Daniel Stephenson

Cell: 318-308-7225

Office: 318-473-6590

dstephenson@agcenter.lsu.edu

2017 Louisiana Rice Acreage Survey Results

2017 Louisiana Rice Acreage Survey Results published on No Comments on 2017 Louisiana Rice Acreage Survey Results
(click to view results on AgCenter Website)

The results of the 2017 Louisiana Rice Variety Survey are now available online. The survey contains information on:

  • Total rice production in each parish and the percentage of long, medium, and special purpose rice
  • Breakdown of long grain, medium grain, and special purpose varieties and hybrids grown
  • Ratoon and conservation tillage practices used in each parish
  • Planting and water management cultural practices used by farming operations in each parish
  • Various maps and figures summarizing the findings

This survey is done annually by Extension Agents in each of the rice producing parishes by contacting their rice producers and seed distributors. In many cases, the survey results may not exactly match FSA certified planted acres. Deviations can be the result of many factors. The most common factors include large farming operations which farm in multiple parishes only reporting in one parish. Included in the data this year for the first time is water management practices including furrow irrigated rice (row rice) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD). Furrow irrigated rice management was reported in only two Louisiana Parishes with a total of 1,400 acres. The individual survey results, maps and figures are available on the LSU AgCenter Website (individual survey results). All of the data combined into one document can be found here (Complete Results Document). A big thank you to all of the Extension Agents who help make this survey possible!

Weeds: Problematic Year-Round

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Weeds: Problematic Year-Round

Josh Copes, Daniel Stephenson, Donnie Miller, and Lauren Lazaro

 

Prolonged rains coupled with the high temperatures during August delayed harvest, caused crop damage, and environmental conditions were optimal for weed growth. We have received several phone calls concerning weeds requiring a herbicide application to better facilitate harvest. Once the crop dries down, weeds will begin to receive adequate sunlight allowing for rapid growth and development. If harvest is delayed for too long weeds, in particular vines, will quickly limit harvest efficiency. Paraquat (1 to 2 pints/acre), Aim (1 to 2 oz/acre), and sodium chlorate (4.8 quarts/acre) are labeled as harvest aids in corn. Labels require 7, 3, and 14 days for paraquat, Aim, and soidium chlorate, respectively, between application and harvest. Seven days or more will be required for adequate weed desiccation. Maximum water volume (gallons of water per acre) should be utilized as large weed size and growth habit within and on top of crop will limit herbicide coverage and desiccation efficacy. After the weeds have dried sufficiently to allow for harvest (and label requirements have passed), harvest as soon as possible to reduce the risk of weed re-growth.

Calls have also been received regarding control options for weeds post-harvest. Earlier harvest trends have resulted in adequate time for weeds to set seed between harvest and a killing frost. This time period can range from 1 to 4 months. The average first frost date in North and Central Louisiana is November 15 and 25, respectively. Since a lot of money and effort is spent in controlling weeds during the growing season to negate yield loss, timely weed control practices following harvest is important. These practices can reduce weed seed return to the soil seedbank, thus ensuring fewer weeds to fight in future cropping seasons. Post-harvest weed control is especially important in fields containing herbicide resistant weeds. A good example to illustrate the importance of post-harvest weed management is the ability of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth to produce mature seed in as little as 30 days after emergence during late summer and early fall. Many other grass and broadleaf weeds are capable of setting viable seed in a similar time frame.

For weeds that are present in the field at harvest time, mowing and/or tillage should be conducted as soon as possible upon harvest to ensure viable seed set is reduced. Rainfall will influence subsequent germination of weed seed and therefore the need for additional weed control. Furthermore, rainfall following cultivation could increase weed seed germination, however, if the weeds are controlled, the soil seedbank would be reduced. Producers in no-till systems will have to rely on mowing and herbicides to prevent weed seed production.

Other methods of weed control include the use of herbicides. Herbicide applications should be targeted from late-September through October when the time period from application to first killing frost is shortened. Multiple herbicide applications for post-harvest control of summer annual weeds should be avoided. Residual herbicides such as S-metolachlor, pyroxasulfone, linuron, and diuron, among others, can be applied in the fall following harvest. However, rotation interval restrictions must be followed and length of residual control will be influenced by soil temperature and saturation. Glyphosate plus 2,4-D and/or dicamba or paraquat plus diuron and/or linuron are some choices for late-fall post-harvest applications. Diuron and linuron will offer soil residual; however, if soil temperatures are warm and rainfall frequent, do not expect long residual from these products. Likewise the lack of rainfall to properly activate residual herbicides to minimize weed germination can negatively impact treatment effectiveness.  Maximize water volume to ensure good weed coverage, as this is critical for good weed control, especially for paraquat plus diuron and/or linuron.

To reiterate, some weeds are capable of setting viable seed within 30 days after emergence during late summer and early fall. Post-harvest weed control is especially important when combatting glyphosate-resistant weeds such as Palmer amaranth, waterhemp, or johnsongrass. Problem fields should be identified and receive top priority for preventing seed return to the soil seedbank. Once harvested these problem fields should be mowed or tilled shortly after harvest to prevent and/or reduce seed set. Fields should then be regularly scouted for emerging weeds and additional control tactics applied prior to seed set. This will require close inspection of weed species to determine when they are flowering. Once a weed species is observed flowering a weed control operation should be implemented. Depending on weather conditions following harvest, weed control tactics may need to be implemented approximately every 3 to 4 weeks until a killing frost has occurred. If glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth or waterhemp is an issue, a management tactic (i.e. mowing, tillage, herbicide application) should be employed every 3 to 4 weeks.

Fall herbicide applications can be made for control of perennial weed species such as johnsongrass, bermudagrass, alligatorweed, and redvine. Studies conducted by LSU AgCenter weed scientist have determined that fall applications should be made from September 15 to October 15 when environmental conditions favor weed growth (http://www.lsuagcenter.com/portals/communications/publications/agmag/archive/2006/summer/longterm-management-of-perennial-weeds-starts-in-the-fall). For johnsongrass, bermudagrass and alligatorweed control, 1.0 lb ai/acre of glyphosate should be applied. Two lb ai/acre of glyphosate or dicamba are effective control options for redvine. Glyphosate (2.0 lb ai/acre) plus dicamba (1.0 lb ai/acre) can also be an effective control option. Fields should be scouted the fall following herbicide application to determine whether an additional application is needed. Do not mow or till fields for several weeks following herbicide application.

If you have any questions please contact us.

Josh Copes

Cell: 318-334-0401

Office: 318-766-4607

jcopes@agcenter.lsu.edu

 

Donnie Miller

Cell: 318-614-4044

Office: 318-766-4607

dmiller@agcenter.lsu.edu

 

Daniel Stephenson

Cell: 318-308-7225

Office: 318-473-6590

dstephenson@agcenter.lsu.edu

 

Lauren Lazaro

Cell: 210-562-0878

Office: 225-578-2724

llazaro@agcenter.lsu.edu

Late Season Flood/Storm Events in Louisiana Soybeans

Late Season Flood/Storm Events in Louisiana Soybeans published on No Comments on Late Season Flood/Storm Events in Louisiana Soybeans

Over the next few days, producers across the state will begin to assess damages to soybeans brought upon by tropical system Harvey.  Unfortunately, there is no cookie cutter answer to how a system like this will affect every grower.  The main distinction of how varying situations will need to be assessed is the growth stage of the soybeans at the time the event occurred.

The lack of available oxygen for plant processes is the main concern in flooded fields. Oxygen is required for many essential plant processes including respiration, water uptake, root growth, and nodulation.  When flood water covers a field, the oxygen concentration drops quickly and can be depleted in as little as 24 hours.  However, depending on additional factors, soybeans can survive flooded conditions for up to 96 hours.

Temperature: Higher temperatures (ambient and water) will accelerate plant respiration, leading to a depletion of oxygen sooner than cool temperatures with cloudy weather.

Water movement: Even moderate water movement can increase aerification and allow oxygen to the plant roots.

Soil type: Flooding is potentially worse on poorly drained clay soils due to the reduction in hydraulic conductivity (the speed at which water can move through and out of the soil) compared to coarse soils.

According to research conducted in Baton Rouge in the late 1990s, the most sensitive growth stages of soybeans to flood stress are the early reproductive stages of R3 to R5 with yield reductions as high as 93% and 67%, respectively, when flood water remained for seven days (Linkemer et al., 1998).  The lack of oxygen associated with flood waters reduces the plants ability to develop additional plant material due to a reduction of photosynthesis and respiration.  At R3, the loss of yield is caused by a reduction in both the number of pods and seed size while the yield reduction at R5 is attributed mainly to seed size.   The same study showed little loss in yield for soybeans flooded after R6 as this rapid seed fill stage is believed to be protected against temporary stresses (Linkemer et al., 1998; Westgate et al., 1989).

R5 Soybeans in standing water. Soybeans are most sensetive to flooding at growth stages R3 to R5. Todd Spivey

R8 soybeans in standing water. Todd Spivey

 

The yield losses discussed in these studies however, only refer to direct reductions of seed number and size by the plant.  The studies presented do not account for yield and quality reductions caused by outside factors associated with these type of weather events.  Late season flooding followed by warm conditions can become conducive to several fungal diseases such as aerial blight, anthracnose, pod and stem blight, and soybean rust.  It is important producers continue to scout fields for an increase in disease incidence in the coming days.

Consideration should also be given to the possibility of seed rot and seed sprouting.  Sprouting can occur in seed that have previously dried down to below 50% moisture before experiencing extremely wet weather.  Additionally, ease of harvest can be reduced with soybeans that received an application of gramoxone just prior to the storm.  As the leaves desiccate and are removed from the plant the stem can still imbibe water.  With no leaves to aid in moving the water out of the stem, the stems will not dry down and producers can see an increase in green stem incidence in many fields.   

 

Linkemer, G, J.E. Board, and M.E. Musgrave. 1998. Waterlogging effects on growth and yield components of late-planted soybean. Crop Sci. 38:1576-1584.

Westgate, M.E., J.R. Schussler, D.C. Reicosky, and M.L. Brenner. 1989. Effect of water deficits on seed development in soybean. II. Conservation of seed growth rate. Plant Physiol. 91:980-985.

Use of Harvest Aids in Louisiana Soybeans

Use of Harvest Aids in Louisiana Soybeans published on No Comments on Use of Harvest Aids in Louisiana Soybeans
Todd Spivey, Sebe Brown, Josh Copes, Donnie Miller, Boyd Padgett

Over the last several weeks, we have received numerous calls about soybean harvest aid timing, products, and general recommendations.  The use of harvest aids in Louisiana soybeans is a common practice, with timely applications improving seed quality and harvest efficiency while potentially resulting in a soybean harvest 10 to 14 days earlier when compared to non-treated beans.

Timing

If the goal of harvest aid use in soybeans is to promote early harvest and improved harvest efficiency, harvest aids must be applied as timely as possible.  Once seed have separated from the white membrane inside the pod, they have reached physiological maturity and will no longer increase in size.  Any use of a harvest aid prior to the majority of seed reaching physiological maturity will result in a loss in yield.  Table 1 gives the paraquat label requirements for harvest aid application timing in soybean. Research conducted in Louisiana by Dr. Jim Griffin and Joey Boudreaux established that a harvest aid application could be made to soybean without yield penalty as long as soybeans are at reproductive growth stage R6.5 (physiological maturity). They provided a list of procedures to help determine when harvest aids can be safely applied to soybeans:

  1. Begin to scout fields for harvest aid timing when leaves begin to yellow
  2. Collect pods from the top four nodes of the plant at multiple, random locations within a field
  3. Open soybeans from pod, they should shell easily, and look for soybean separation from the white membrane
  4. If soybean separation from the white membrane has occurred for all pods collected, the seed has reached maximum dry weight and harvest aid application can be made without yield penalty

Plant appearance at growth stage R6.5 will vary by variety so close attention should be made to pods collected from the field and if seed have separated from the white membrane (Griffin and Boudreaux 2011 Louisiana Agriculture magazine Vol. 54, No. 2, Spring 2011).

Table 1. Proper application timing of harvest aid in indeterminate and determinate soybean varieties.
Indeterminate Varieties 65% of pods have reached a mature brown color or seed moisture is less than 30%
Determinate Varieties Plants are mature; beans are fully developed, 50% of leaves have dropped and remaining leaves are yellowing.

Products

Producers have several harvest aid options, though the typical harvest aid application consists of paraquat with an additional nonionic surfactant.  With excessive morningglory pressure, growers might consider including carfentrazone (Aim) or saflufenacil (Sharpen) with paraquat to improve desiccation of vines and in situations with high grass pressure, a tank-mix of paraquat with sodium chlorate may be warranted to improve the desiccation of grassy weeds prior to harvest.  Questions have also been received in regards to the use of sodium chlorate to aid in drift reduction of paraquat applications made by air.  The LSU AgCenter has no data to support this claim and only recommends the use of these products together for improved desiccation of weeds and soybeans present in the field.

It is also imperative that producers consider the required preharvest interval (PHI) associated with each product label.  When using multiple products, the longest PHI must be adhered to.  Labeled rates and comments are presented below in the excerpt from the 2017 Louisiana Suggested Weed Management Guide.

Labeled rates and comments of soybean harvest aid products from the 2017 Louisiana Suggested Weed Management Guide

Redbanded Stink Bug Considerations

Producers should also continue monitoring redbanded stink bug (RBSB) populations and should not rule out the inclusion of an insecticide with the application of a harvest aid.  LSU AgCenter entomologists recommend the control of threshold populations of RBSB until the soybeans are out of the field.  This means that many producers could, and should, include an insecticide for the control of RBSB with their harvest aid application (sodium chlorate cannot be tank-mixed with any insecticide).  It is important to keep in mind the restrictions placed upon many of the products at this point in the season.  These restrictions may include total active ingredient restrictions and PHIs.  Acephate, a common recommendation for RBSB control, can only be applied up to 2 lb ai A-1 year-1 in Louisiana.  Other insecticides also have increased PHI such as the pre-mix product Endigo, with a PHI of 30 days.  It is important to read and adhere to the label of all labeled materials prior to use.  When label restrictions prevent the inclusion of an insecticide with the harvest aid, producers should not delay the harvest of soybean so that the seed can be removed from the field as quick as the label allows.

Redbanded Stink Bug Numbers Increasing in Soybeans

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Reports from the field indicate redbanded stink bug (RBSB) numbers are beginning to build in soybeans at the R5 development stage and beyond. Once RBSB colonize a field, native stink bugs often are forced out or are outcompeted, leaving only RBSB behind. The Louisiana threshold for RBSB is four insects per 25 sweeps. RBSB are strong fliers, and routine scouting is essential to detecting an influx of these insects. Furthermore, the presence of immatures signals that RBSBs are reproducing, meaning previously applied insecticidal controls may no longer be active. Recommended insecticides include pyrethroids, neonicotonoids and organophosphates.

The use of premix insecticides, including Endigo ZC and Leverage 360, may offer a degree of repellency not observed with other insecticides. Insecticide efficacy tests conducted at the Macon Ridge Research Station in Winnsboro demonstrated satisfactory control of RBSB while also having a possible added benefit of repellency. However, these insecticides perform best when populations of RBSB have not exceeded threshold. Once RBSB populations have exceeded threshold, the use of tank mixes of either acephate (0.75 to 1.0 pounds per acre) plus bifenthrin (6.4 ounces per acre) or Belay (4.0 ounces per acre) plus bifenthrin (4.0 ounces per acre) may be required to get them under control.

As with most insects, staying ahead of RBSB populations will make season-long control much easier while also reducing injury. Please contact your county agent or me for more information.

Bt Cotton Situation

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For the past two weeks, most of Louisiana has been in the midst of a very large bollworm moth flight. Our moth trap catches were averaging about 10 moths per day and moved to more than 100 late last week. I have received numerous phone calls on how the technology is holding up and what insecticide should be used to over-spray. Another issue to consider is how much these worms were pre-selected in Bt corn. My colleagues around the Midsouth and Texas have seen a very large number of worms coming through Bt corn and Louisiana is no exception. Further, LSU AgCenter entomologists discovered a change in susceptibility of bollworm to Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. The resistance does not appear to be complete and some fitness costs may be associated. If these results are any indication of Louisiana’s bollworm population this year, we may experience more escapes in Bt cotton.

Results from our Bt technology tests and reports from the field indicate that Widestrike cottons (including 499, 312 and 333) are experiencing large amounts of injury. Our small plot work at the Macon Ridge Research Station in Winnsboro is averaging 10 percent fruit injury in Widestrike (WS) and 6 percent in Widestrike 3 (WS3). Based on our work we conducted with the mid-South entomology group last year, we validated a 6 percent fruit injury threshold in Bt cotton. Therefore, WS3 is better than WS, but both technologies would need to be over-sprayed to preserve yield in this situation.

Furthermore, Bollgard 2 (BG2) and Twinlink (TL) have a more robust Bt package than WS. However, I have seen these technologies fail under severe pressure. As of this week, reports from the field and results from our trial work indicate BG2 is still performing well — but this can change quickly. TwinLink’s performance has been inconsistent, with a number escapes being reported. This seems to be dependent on the environment and insect pressure. Keep in mind that stress can negatively affect Bt expression in cotton. Stressed plants may not express a high enough level of toxin to control bollworms.

Independent of environmental factors, if bollworm escapes are detected, a rescue spray may be warranted. The use of pyrethroids is strongly discouraged. Louisiana bollworm populations have the highest level of pyrethroid resistance in the United States, and pyrethroid applications may not provide adequate control. They may even flare secondary pests such as spider mites. The LSU AgCenter recommends the diamide chemistry (Prevathon, Besiege) for control of bollworms in cotton. Beware that Besiege contains a pyrethroid and use may inadvertently flare secondary pests. Keep in mind that bollworms are cryptic feeders, and worms that have established in squares and bolls may not be controlled by diamides. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact your county agent or me.

Estimating Yield Potential of Corn

Estimating Yield Potential of Corn published on No Comments on Estimating Yield Potential of Corn

This article covers how to estimate the yield potential of field corn.  Please contact Drs. Dan Fromme, cellphone: (318)-880-8079 office: (318) 427-4424 or Josh Copes, cellphone (318) 334-0401, office (318) 766-3769 for more information.

Louisiana Rice Notes #8

Louisiana Rice Notes #8 published on No Comments on Louisiana Rice Notes #8

 

This edition covers the current rice market outlook, crop progress, a potential tropical depression, mid-season fertilization, GA use for ratoon crop, and drain timing.

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