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2012 Cotton Harvest Aid Guidelines for Louisiana

2012 Cotton Harvest Aid Guidelines for Louisiana published on No Comments on 2012 Cotton Harvest Aid Guidelines for Louisiana

Dr. Donnie Miller, Professor, Northeast Research Station

Dr. Daniel Stephenson, Associate Professor, Dean Lee Research Station

Dr. John Kruse, Assistant Professor, Central and Northeast Research Station

Introduction

One of the last, but most important, steps in producing a cotton crop is harvest preparation.  Successful harvest preparation includes scheduling for defoliation and harvest operations, removal of foliage and facilitating boll opening.  Successful defoliation has many benefits including increased picker efficiency, elimination of trash in harvested seedcotton, faster drying of dew thereby increasing picking hours per day, straightening of lodged plants and reduction of boll rot incidence.

The activity of harvest aids is very dependent on environmental factors.  Moreover, cotton defoliation is a balancing act between leaf injury that stimulates leaf drop, yet does not desiccate and stick leaves on the plant.  No one harvest aid tank mix will work in all situations.  A good understanding of the influence of defoliation timing and the relative attributes of available harvest aids can help in deciding when to terminate a crop and which harvest aids to use.

Defoliation Timing

There is always a balancing act between yield and fiber quality when defoliating cotton, but close attention to individual fields can help maintain quality while preserving yield. There are several accepted methods to time defoliation, and all methods have strengths and weaknesses.  The following is a refresher of some of the more common defoliation-timing techniques.

Percent Open Bolls

The most widely used method is based on a determination of the total percentage of bolls in a field that have opened, with 60% of bolls open being the most common recommendation for defoliant application. In many situations, unopened bolls are mature enough to resist negative impact and will open before harvest. This method, however, has limitations. Research inLouisianahas shown that, depending on fruit distribution on the plant, maximum yield can be obtained when defoliation occurs before 60% open bolls. Additionally, in cases where a large fruiting “gap” (no bolls present at fruiting sites) occurs and a large percentage of bolls are less mature and set in the uppermost region of the plant, optimum defoliation timing may occur later than 70% open.  Research evaluating optimum defoliation timing in Louisiana and other states has shown maximum yield can be achieved with application ranging from 42% to 81% open, depending on crop maturity and fruit distribution.

Nodes Above Cracked Boll (NACB)

The node above cracked boll (NACB) method, in contrast to the percent open boll method, focuses on the unopened portion of the crop. NACB is determined by locating the uppermost first-position boll that is cracked open with visible lint and counting the number of main-stem nodes to the uppermost harvestable boll. By focusing on the unopened portion, NACB takes into account potential fruiting gaps. Most recommendations call for defoliation at four NACB. Low plant population and skip-row cotton, however, are often more safely defoliated at three NACB. Lower plant population usually means a later-maturing crop, with a significant portion of yield coming from outer-position bolls and bolls set on vegetative branches.

 Accumulated Heat Units After Cutout

 Similar to NACB, a method developed in Arkansas recommends defoliation after accumulation of 850 heat units, or DD60s, after cutout. A DD60 is a measure of accumulated heat needed for growth and development using a 60o F minimum. Research from Louisiana indicates that under our environmental  conditions, the appropriate defoliation timing may be greater than 850 heat units (that is, 1050 heat units) beyond a cutout of node above white flower 4 (four main-stem nodes above uppermost first-position white flower). While this method does focus on the unopened portion of the crop and is supposed to allow enough time and DD60s for full development of all bolls, it requires making a determination of cutout. The definition of cutout is a moving target and can often be different for every field.

 

Daily DD60 =  (Daily High + Daily Low) ÷ 2 – 60       ex. 95 + 74 = 169 ÷ 2 = 84.5 – 60 = 24.5 DD60’s

Visual Inspection

Whatever method is employed, growers should also visually inspect unopened bolls for maturity. A boll is considered mature if it is difficult to slice in cross-section with a knife and seeds have begun to form a tan/brown or black seed coat. Once a dark seed coat has formed, defoliation will not affect yield of those bolls adversely. Cotton bolls need 40 to 60 days to mature, depending on temperature. Bolls set later in the season will take longer to mature and may never be harvestable. Growers should walk their fields before defoliation and examine only those bolls that can reasonably be expected to mature.

Research in Louisiana has shown that, on average, cotton is harvested from a 12-14 node range on the plant.  This fact can serve as a tool to simplify identifying the last harvestable boll as well as timing defoliation.  To use the 12-node rule, identify the lowest first position boll that is expected to be harvested.  Count up 12 nodes on the plant.  The boll present at that position is likely to contribute to yield.  Under some circumstance, a boll on the 14th node from the bottom could be considered harvestable.  Bolls produced above that position on the plant are unlikely to contribute to yield and waiting on them to mature places heavier bolls at the bottom of the plant at risk to unnecessary weather-related losses.  Once the last harvestable boll has been identified, use the visual inspection technique to determine when it is mature and ready for defoliation.

Harvest Scheduling

Harvest capacity also should be a consideration in relation to defoliation timing. In general, defoliating only the amount of acreage that can be harvested within the 12-day period following treatment greatly reduces exposure of lint to weathering loss and possible grade discounts. Additionally, a delayed harvest may require regrowth to be controlled more aggressively using higher rates of regrowth-inhibiting products. In severe cases, an additional application of desiccant may be required to remove regrowth.

Defoliation may not always be warranted because cotton that is completely cutout will drop some of its leaves naturally. If cotton is harvested with care, defoliation may not be needed to eliminate leaf trash and prevent excess staining. Before proceeding with this option, growers are strongly urged to harvest an adequate sample to evaluate effects on ginning efficiency. Limited research inLouisianahas suggested that as little as 20% green leaf (mature and juvenile) on the plant can significantly affect final grade and loan value when a single lint cleaning operation is used. Therefore, growers are urged to proceed with caution when deciding to eliminate defoliation.

Defoliation of Late-Maturing Varieties

Full-season varieties tend to initiate fruiting on higher nodes and cutout earlier compared with earlier varieties.  The implication for defoliation timing is that these varieties are more likely to continue to produce small, green bolls in the top of the plant.  The value of waiting on these bolls is questionable, especially considering the relative lack of “stormproofness” of these varieties.  The temptation, however, will be to wait on those bolls at the top of the plant to mature.  In many cases, these varieties may need to be picked with some green bolls at the top of the plant, but this can be done without reducing overall yield.

Table of Expected Activity of Various Harvest   Aids

Material

Estimated minimum   temperature

Expected activity

Mature leaves

Juvenile growth

Regrowth prevention

Boll opening

Def 6/Folex 6 EC

60oF

Excellent

Fair

Poor

None

Thidiazuron

65oF

Excellent

Excellent

Excellent

None

Ginstar EC

60oF

Excellent

Excellent

Excellent

None

Aim EC

55oF

Good-Excellent

Excellent

Poor

None

ET

55oF

Good-Excellent

Excellent

Poor

None

Resource

55oF

Good-Excellent

Excellent

Poor

None

Blizzard

55oF

Good-Excellent

Excellent

Poor

None

Ethephon

60oF

Fair

Poor

Poor

Excellent

Finish 6 Pro

60oF

Excellent

Poor

Fair

Excellent

FirstPick

60oF

Good/Excellent

Poor

Poor-Fair

Excellent

Glyphosate

55oF

Fair

Fair

Excellent

None

Sodium Chlorate

55oF

Fair

Fair

Poor

None

Paraquat

55oF

Desiccation

Excellent

Poor

Fair

Spray Coverage

Thorough canopy coverage is essential for acceptable results with all harvest aids.  Carrier volume and nozzle selection are the most important factors in obtaining adequate spray coverage.  Research in Louisiana and Tennessee has indicated that defoliant activity increases as carrier volume increases.  Carrier volumes less than 10 GPA are not recommended, and 15 GPA is suggested.  Lower carrier volumes increase the likelihood of needing a second application.  While higher carrier volumes are inconvenient, water remains the cheapest thing that you can put in the tank.

The use of drift-reduction nozzles has become widespread in recent years.  These nozzles are excellent at controlling drift and placement of any spray solution.  However, as droplet sizes become larger, thorough coverage of leaf surfaces within the canopy can decrease.  Research inLouisianaandTennesseehas shown decreased defoliant activity with some drift-reducing nozzles when used at low operating pressures and/or low carrier volumes.  Flat-fan and hollow cone nozzles provide excellent spray coverage of harvest aids and are recommended for most applications.  Always operate calibrated sprayers within the nozzle manufacturer’s guidelines for operating pressure and carrier volume to obtain maximum canopy coverage and minimal off-target movement.

 Rotational Crops Restrictions

When double-cropping wheat following cotton, some consideration should be given to label restrictions of harvest aids for rotational crops.  The following table summarizes harvest aid label restrictions for planting wheat following cotton.

Label Restrictions for Planting Small Grains   Following Application as a Harvest Aid in Cotton

Material

Recrop interval following   application for planting small grains

Def 6/Folex 6 EC

None

Thidiazuron

14 days

Ginstar EC

1 month

Aim EC

None

ET

None

Blizzard

None

Resource

30 days

Ethephon

30 days

FirstPick

30 days

Finish 6 Pro

30 days

Glyphosate

None

Sodium Chlorate

None

Paraquat

None

 Harvest Aid Materials

            The following is a list of the majority of products available for use as harvest aids (other products with the same active ingredient may be available).  No one harvest aid or tank mix combination may be appropriate for every situation or field.  The selection of a harvest aid is often made based on prior experience and price.  When selecting a harvest aid program, consider environmental and crop conditions, yield potential, and value of the crop in the field.  All materials listed have strengths and weaknesses and perform better in certain environments.  Always refer to the label for use directions, precautions, notes, appropriate rates, adjuvant use, pre harvest intervals, and tank mixes allowed.

 

Harvest Aids for    Cotton

 

Product

 

Active

Ingredient

 

Labeled Rate of Product per Application per Acre

Acres Treated by 1 Gallon or Pound Product

 

Remarks

Aim EC

 

carfentrazone-ethyl

 

0.25 – 1.6 oz

80 – 512

Can provide desiccation of morning   glories and other broadleaf weeds.  Use   an adjuvant according to label directions.    Maximum of 3.2 oz per season. Rainfall within 6 to 8 hrs after   application may reduce efficacy.  Leaf   desiccation potential may increase with higher rates under high temperature.  Low rate application ranging from 0.25 to   0.5 oz per acre is labeled as a Managed Maturity Application at 15% open boll   being optimum.
FirstPick

 

ethephon + synergist

 

3 – 3.5 qt alone

1.5 – 2 qt tank-mix

1.1 – 1.3

2 – 2.67

Effective   defoliation when applied alone to very mature cotton.  Most consistent defoliation and regrowth   inhibition observed with tank mixes.    Maximum of 3.5 qts per season.
Finish 6 Pro ethephon + cyclanilide

1.3 – 2.67 pt

3 – 6

Rainfall within 6 hrs after application   may reduce efficacy.
Several brands

 

glyphosate

 

    For non-Roundup Ready cotton only.  Use labeled rates for weed control.
ET

 

pyraflufen-ethyl

 

1.5 – 2.75 oz 47 – 85

 

Can provide desiccation of morning   glories and other broadleaf weeds.  Use   an adjuvant according to label directions.

Maximum   of 5.5 oz per season.  Rainfall within   1 hr after application may reduce efficacy.    Leaf desiccation potential may increase with higher rates under high   temperatures.

Resource

 

flumiclorac pentyl-ester

 

6 – 8 oz

 

21 – 32

 

Apply   with 1 – 2 pt COC or methylated seed oil.    Maximum of 14 oz per season.    Rainfall within 1 hr of application may reduce efficacy.
Blizzard

 

fluthiacet-methyl

 

0.5 – 0.6 oz

 

256 – 213

 

Use an adjuvant according to label   directions.  Maximum of 1.25 oz per season.    Rainfall within 1 hr after application may reduce efficacy.

 

DroppSC

FreefallSC

 

thidiazuron

 

1.6 – 6.4 oz

1.6 – 6.4 oz

 

40 – 80

40 – 80

 

Thidiazuron is temperature sensitive;   either avoid or use higher rates in cooler conditions.  Rainfall within 24 hrs after application   may reduce efficacy.

 

Ginstar EC

 

thidiazuron + diuron

 

6.4 – 16 oz

 

10 – 40

 

Higher rates and tankmixes with other   products and adjuvants can increase likelihood of desiccation under high   temperatures.  More active than thidiazuron   alone under cooler conditions.  Maximum   of 16 oz per season.  Rainfall within   12 hrs after application may reduce efficacy.
Def 6

Folex 6 EC

tribufos

 

1.3 – 1.5 pt

 

5.3 – 6.1

 

Maximum   of 1.5 pt per season.  Rainfall within   1 hr after application may reduce efficacy.
Several brands

 

ethephon 1.3 – 2.67 pt 3 – 6.1 Maximum   of 2 lb per season (2.67 pt of a 6 lb formulated material).  Rainfall within 6 hr after application may   reduce efficacy.
Gramoxone Inteon paraquat

 

See   label   See label for specific application   timings.  Maximum of 2 pt per   season.  Rainfall within 15 min of   application may reduce efficacy.  Can   provide desiccation of weeds.

 

Several   brands sodium chlorate

 

See label

 

  Can   provide desiccation of weeds.

Defoliation Decision Guide

This guide can be used in determining the appropriate harvest aid or harvest aid combination for particular situations. Use the key to identify the group of suggested materials that best fit a specific situation. Some of the products are sold under a variety of trade names; refer to the descriptions of specific materials for alternate brand names. The following should be used only as a guide in determining materials, combinations and rates. Cotton response to these and other harvest aid options always depends on environmental conditions, sometimes requiring rates higher or lower on the labeled range than those suggested here. For some combinations, an adjuvant may be required or suggested on the label. Always read and follow label instructions.

 

Expected daytime high temperature above 80 degrees F

Regrowth potential is high

Boll opening is needed

Will attempt a once-over defoliation program……………… SEE GROUP 1

Will be a two-step program……………………………………………… SEE GROUP 2

Boll opening is not needed

Will attempt a once-over defoliation program……………… SEE GROUP 3

Will be a two-step program……………………………………………… SEE GROUP 4

Regrowth potential is low

Boll opening is needed

Will attempt a once-over defoliation program……………… SEE GROUP 5

Will be a two-step program……………………………………………… SEE GROUP 6

Boll opening is not needed

Will attempt a once-over defoliation program……………… SEE GROUP 7

Will be a two-step program……………………………………………… SEE GROUP 8

 

Expected daytime high temperature lower than 80 degrees F

Boll opening is needed

Will attempt a once-over defoliation program……………………………. SEE GROUP 9

Will be a two-step program……………………………………………………………. SEE GROUP 10

Boll opening is not needed

Will attempt a once-over defoliation program……………………………. SEE GROUP 11

Will be a two-step program……………………………………………………………. SEE GROUP 12

Suggested Harvest Aids and Combinations

 

GROUP 1 – High temperatures; boll opening; regrowth control; once-over

thidiazuron 2.4 – 3.2 oz + ethephon 1.3 pt

thidiazuron 1.6 – 2.4 oz + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt + ethephon 1.3 pt

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*  +  ethephon 1.3 pt

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + FirstPick 2.0 qt

**Glyphosate 1 lb ai + ethephon 1.3 pt or Finish 6 Pro1.3 pt or FirstPick 2.0 qt

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

**For control of grasses and pigweeds only in non-RR cotton. Weed control may take 14 days.

 

GROUP 2 – High temperatures; boll opening; regrowth control; two-step programs

thidiazuron 2.4 oz + ethephon 1.3 pt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials)

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt followed Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5-2 oz*

thdiazuron 1.6 oz + FirstPick 2.0 qt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz* + ethephon 1.3 pt or Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt or FirstPick 2.0 qt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials)  + ethephon 1.3 pt or Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 – 2.0 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

FirstPick 3.0 – 3.5 qt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 3 – High temperatures; regrowth control; once over

thidiazuron 2.4 – 3.2 oz (for well-cutout cotton only)

thidiazuron 1.6 – 2.4 oz + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials)

thidiazuron 1.6 – 2.4 oz + Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Ginstar EC 6.4 – 8 oz (potential for desiccation increases with rate and temperature)

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 4 – High temperatures; regrowth control; two-step programs

thidiazuron 1.6 – 2.4 oz followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Aim 1.0 oz followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Ginstar EC 6.4 oz followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 5 – High temperatures; low regrowth potential; boll opening; once-over

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) + ethephon 1.3 pt

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + FirstPick 2.0 qt

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 – 1.5 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) + ethephon 21 oz

Finish 6 Pro 2.0 pt

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

FirstPick 2.0 qt + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt (lower rates have provided good defoliation and reduced potential for desiccation in research trials) or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 6 – High temperatures; low regrowth potential; boll opening; two-step programs

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt + ethephon 1.3 pt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + ethephon 1.3 pt followed Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 – 1.5 pt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

FirstPick 2.0 qt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 7 – High temperatures; low regrowth potential; once over

thidiazuron 1.6 oz + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 – 1.5 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.5 – 2.0 pt

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 8 – High temperatures; low regrowth potential; two-step programs

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Aim 1.0 oz followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 9 – Lower temperatures; boll opening; once over

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 – 1.5 pt + ethephon 1.5 pt or Finish 6 Pro 1.3 – 1.5 pt

Finish 6 Pro 1.5 – 2.0 pt

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 – 1.5 pt + Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

FirstPick 2.0 qt + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt

FirstPick 2.0 qt + Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Ginstar EC 6.4 – 9 oz + ethephon 1.3 pt

Ginstar EC 6.4 oz + Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 10 – Lower temperatures; boll opening; two-step programs

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 – 1.5 pt + ethephon 1.5 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt + Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.3 pt + FirstPick 2.0 qt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 – 1.5 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 pt followed by Finish 6 Pro 1.0 pt

FirstPick 3.0 – 3.5 qt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Ginstar EC 6.4 oz + ethephon 1.3 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Aim 1.0 oz + ethephon 1.5 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 11 – Lower temperatures; once over

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.5 – 2.0 pt

Finish 6 Pro 1.3 – 1.5 pt + Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.0 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Finish 6 Pro 1.5 – 2.0 pt

FirstPick 2.0 – 3.0 qt + Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Ginstar EC 6-10 oz

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

GROUP 12 – Lower temperatures; two-step

Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.5 pt followed by Def 6/Folex 6 EC 1.5 pt or Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Aim 1.0 oz/ET 1.5 oz followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Finish 6 Pro 1.5 pt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

PirstPick 2.0 qt followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Ginstar EC 6 oz followed by Ginstar EC 6 oz

Ginstar EC 6 – 9 oz followed by Aim 1.0 oz*/ET 1.5 oz*

Sodium chlorate followed by sodium chlorate

*Addition of Aim or ET at recommended rates will desiccate most broadleaf weed species.  Blizzard and Resource at labeled rates have resulted in similar levels of cotton defoliation.

 

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Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, William B. Richardson, Chancellor

Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, John S. Russin, Vice Chancellor and Director

LouisianaCooperative Extension Service, Paul D. Coreil, Vice Chancellor and Director

Pub.  3194                   (online only)    8/12

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. The Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service provides equal opportunities in programs and employment.

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