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Black Root Rot Suspected in Louisiana Soybean

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Assistant Professor, Field Crop Pathology, Macon Ridge Research Station

Over the past two weeks, I have received many phone calls and conducted numerous field visits concerning black root rot of soybean. The suspected causal agent is Thielaviopsis basicola, which has primarily been described as a seedling disease of cotton. In 2009, the disease was described as a disease of vegetative soybean in Arkansas (http://www.apsnet.org/publications/plantdisease/2010/September/Pages/94_9_1168.1.aspx) and has been mentioned as an issue in Mississippi over the past several years (http://www.mississippi-crops.com/2014/08/01/soybean-disease-update-august-1-2014/). Information concerning late-season (R5-R6) symptoms and epidemiology of black root rot is limited.

During pod fill foliar symptoms of black root rot become obvious in soybean fields (below, Plate 1).

BRR1

These symptoms are easily noticed from the turnrow, and upon closer inspection, interveinal chlorosis is evident with leaf veins remaining green (Plates 2 & 3). Inspection below the canopy in the center of the affected area will usually reveal one or several plants that died earlier in the season (Plate 4).

Plate 2. Interveinal chlorosis caused by black root rot.
Plate 2. Interveinal chlorosis caused by black root rot.
Plate 3. Interveinal chlorosis.
Plate 3. Interveinal chlorosis.
Plate 4. Soybean plant death caused by BRR.
Plate 4. Soybean plant death caused by BRR.

Apparently, these dead plants go unnoticed because the death occurred during vegetative or early reproductive stages, and adjacent plants quickly covered them. Surviving, infected plants adjacent to the dead plants will be stunted and displaying these foliar symptoms (Plate 5).

Plate 5. Dead plants (left), stunted plants (center), and healthy plants (right) from a field affected by black root rot.
Plate 5. Dead plants (left), stunted plants (center), and healthy plants (right) from a field affected by black root rot.

Affected plants may snap-off at the soil line when pulled. When plants are excised, roots are black in color (below, Plate 6).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Splitting stems near the crown will reveal white fungal growth in the center of the stem (below, Plate 7). Additionally, infected black plant stems from the previous season are often observed near infected roots.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We have isolated what appears to be Thielaviopsis basicola from diseased roots using a selective medium, and are currently working to confirm identity and pathogenicity. The effects of fungicide seed treatments and in-furrow sprays are unknown. Varietal susceptibilities are currently unknown; however, the official variety trial at Dean Lee Research Station is significantly affected by black root rot and will be rated in an attempt to identify sources of resistance. Additionally, greenhouse screenings may be conducted this winter to corroborate rating information.

This fungus has a broad host range and survives in the soil for long periods of time. Apparently, conditions have been optimal for disease development this year. Incidence in most fields has been <1%; however, in some fields that have been planted to soybean continuously for several years and in a minimum/no till program, incidence has been as high as 10%. This does not necessarily translate to a 10% loss, as affected plants will have the ability to produce some seed depending on disease severity. Anecdotal evidence indicates that rotation to corn will lessen disease incidence. Other diseases/conditions that we have seen this year that may be confused with black root rot include: red crown rot, sudden death syndrome, and triazole burn (Plates 8, 9, 10, and 11).

Plate 8. Foliar symptoms of sudden death syndrome and/or red crown rot.
Plate 8. Foliar symptoms of sudden death syndrome and/or red crown rot.

 Plate 9. Red crown rot fruiting structures on soybean.

Plate 9. Red crown rot fruiting structures on soybean.

Plate 10. Whitish to bluish spore masses produced by the fungus that causes sudden death syndrome.
Plate 10. Whitish to bluish spore masses produced by the fungus that causes sudden death syndrome.

 

 Plate 11. Triazole fungicide burn.

Plate 11. Triazole fungicide burn.

For more information on these topics or others, please contact your local extension agent, specialist, nearest research station, or visit www.lsuagcenter.com or www.louisianacrops.com.

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