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Should You Apply an In-furrow Starter Fertilizer to Corn?

Should You Apply an In-furrow Starter Fertilizer to Corn? published on No Comments on Should You Apply an In-furrow Starter Fertilizer to Corn?

Josh Copes, Rasel Parvej, Syam Dodla, and Dan Fromme

Phone calls have been coming in regarding applying an in-furrow starter fertilizer at corn planting. An in-furrow starter is commonly called a “pop-up” fertilizer, and is applied in the seed furrow (in-furrow). This allows for ease of application and placing the nutrients close to the germinating seed which allows the seedling to have easy access to nutrients. A good in-furrow fertilizer will contain a high percentage of phosphorus along with some nitrogen, but could also contain sulfur, potassium, or micro-nutrients. In Louisiana, ammonium polyphosphate fertilizers, 10-34-0 and 11-37-0, are commonly used in-furrow. When applied in-furrow, there is potential for salt and ammonia injury from fertilizers with high salt indexes or contain urea- or ammonium-nitrogen. Urea is, therefore, not recommended to be applied in-furrow. Adequate soil moisture at planting, however, decreases the likelihood of potential salt injury. Another starter fertilizer placement strategy is applying in a 2 X 2 band (2” to the side of the seed furrow and 2” below the seed depth). This method of application requires additional planter attachments, but allows for use of higher rates of fertilizer at planting and avoid salt and ammonia injury. In-furrow application rates in excess of 5 gallons per acre of ammonium polyphosphate in corn are not advised. If you would like to know more about salt index for fertilizers visit this web site: http://www.spectrumanalytic.com/support/library/ff/salt_index_calculation.htm.

In Louisiana, considerable research has been conducted on the use of starter fertilizers in corn, either with 10-34-0 or 11-37-0 (Mascagni et al. 2006). In five out of 15 trials (conducted from 1991 to 2005), corn grain yield was significantly increased by the use of an in-furrow starter fertilizer. It should be noted that in each year soil-test-based phosphorus levels were considered high in the test area. Therefore, corn yield increase could still occur even though soil test phosphorus levels are high. Phosphorus deficiency symptoms and yield responses to the in-furrow fertilizer were most common in light textured soils (e.g. sandy loam and silt loam soils). Mascagni et al. (2006) also documented that nitrogen only fertilizers had little effect on early season plant growth whereas, in-furrow fertilizers containing phosphorus increased early season plant growth in all trials. This demonstrates that it is the phosphorus component that improved early season plant growth. The enhanced plant growth from the phosphorus containing fertilizers, also, resulted in hastened maturity of the corn crop. Mid-silk occurred four days earlier where yield responses were observed and three days earlier when no yield response occurred.

With low commodity prices and high input costs, producers are concerned whether or not they should spend the money on applying an in-furrow starter. Situations where a positive yield response will likely occur from the use of in-furrow phosphorus containing fertilizers are: 1) Planting earlier than recommended, 2) Planting in high residue/no-till situations, 3) When there is a need to apply phosphorus fertilizer based on soil test results, 4) Years with poor early season growing conditions (low temperature and excessive rainfall). Soils, especially, sandy and silt loam soils are slow to warm in the spring. Cool soils can often result in reduced phosphorus uptake by the plant resulting in temporary phosphorus deficiency, even though soil test phosphorus levels are adequate. Therefore, when planting earlier than February 25 in south and central Louisiana and March 10 in north Louisiana, an in-furrow starter may be beneficial. High residue situations typically result in cooler and wetter soils that can result in poor early growth and phosphorus deficiencies. Also, early season nitrogen deficiencies may occur in high residue/no-till situations. When soil test levels calls for the addition of phosphorus, using an in-furrow starter would be recommended. As mentioned earlier, in-furrow application of the fertilizer allows easy access of the nutrients since it is applied in a concentrated band with the seed. Unfortunately, we cannot predict early season growing conditions, an in-furrow starter can be cheap insurance against detrimental cool and wet weather conditions often experienced in Louisiana in March.

In summary, if you are equipped to apply a fertilizer in-furrow and plan on planting as early as possible or into high residue/no-till situations then applying an in-furrow starter may be beneficial. If soil test reports call for the addition of phosphorus then an in-furrow starter would be a good method to place the phosphorus in close proximity to the developing roots. Also nutrient use efficiency may be greater compared to a broadcast application of phosphorus, especially if the broadcast application occurred in the fall. This is due in part to time, since an in-furrow application is applied at planting, there is less time for soil reactions to “tie” up phosphorus from being available for plant uptake. Soil pH should, also, be considered for the decision of when to apply phosphorus. Phosphorus is most plant available from 6.5 to 7.5 pH range. If outside this range phosphorus should be applied closer to planting. If you have any questions please contact your local county agent, Drs. Dan Fromme, Rasel Parvej, Syam Dodla, or myself.
Contact Information:

Dr. Josh Copes
Assistant Professor (Agronomy)
Northeast Research Station
Cell: 318-334-0401
Office: 318-766-3769
jcopes@agcenter.lsu.edu

Dr. Syam Dodla
Assistant Professor (Soil Fertility and Irrigation)
Red River Research Station
Office: 318-741-7430 Ext: 1103
sdodla@agcenter.lsu.edu

Dr. Rasel Parvej
Assistant Professor (Soil Fertility)
Scott Research and Extension Center
Office: 318-435-2908
Cell: 497-387-2988
mrparvej@agcenter.lsu.edu

Dr. Dan Fromme
Professor (State Corn, Cotton, and Grain Sorghum Specialist)
Dean Lee Research Station
Office: 318-473-6520
dfromme@agcenter.lsu.edu

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