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Transform Granted Section 18 for Control of Sugarcane Aphid in Louisiana Sorghum (Forage, Grain or Stover)

Transform Granted Section 18 for Control of Sugarcane Aphid in Louisiana Sorghum (Forage, Grain or Stover) published on No Comments on Transform Granted Section 18 for Control of Sugarcane Aphid in Louisiana Sorghum (Forage, Grain or Stover)

Transform WG Sec 18 Label for Sorghum                                                     Approval Letter With Effective/Expiration Use Dates

Please follow the link above to access the section 18 label.  The link to the approval letter outlines the effective and expiration dates for the use of Transform in sorghum, as well as specifics regarding number of applications and maximum acreage treated in Louisiana.

If you have any questions or concerns about sugarcane aphids or use of Transform in Sorghum please contact:

Sebe Brown at 318-498-1283 (cell) or 318-435-2903 (office)

Dr. David Kerns at 318-439-4844 (cell) or 318-435-2157 (office)

Dr. Julien Beuzelin at 337-501-7087 (cell) or 318-473-6523 (office)

Mid-South Tobacco Thrips Resistant to Thiamethoxam

Mid-South Tobacco Thrips Resistant to Thiamethoxam published on No Comments on Mid-South Tobacco Thrips Resistant to Thiamethoxam

Syngenta has confirmed resistance to thiamethoxam, the active ingredient in Cruiser, Avicta Complete, Avicta Duo and Acceleron N seed treatments in four populations of tobacco thrips collected in the Mid-South.  Early indications suggest that this resistance is confined to the Mid-South.  Thiamethoxam is a widely used seed treatment for cotton, corn, soybeans and rice in Louisiana; however, thrips rarely inflict enough injury to corn and soybeans to cause economic losses

Over the past three years we, as well as our colleagues around the Mid-South, have seen a decline in efficacy of thiamethoxam treated cotton seed against tobacco thrips.  Based on limited information, resistance appears to be confined to thiamethoxam and has not been detected with imidacloprid.

Additionally, current data suggests that resistance to thiamethoxam is limited to tobacco thrips; thus western flower thrips, which occur in high numbers some years in Louisiana, still appear to be susceptible.

A larger resistance screening program will be conducted in 2014 and more information and specifics will provided as production meetings commence in the winter and spring.

Please see the following link by Gus Lorenz for additional information.

http://www.arkansas-crops.com/2013/11/08/cruiser-thiamethoxam-seed-treatment-may-be-ineffective-on-tobacco-thrips-in-cotton/

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Sebe Brown or  David Kerns for more information.

Sebe Brown     Cell: 318-498-1283       Office: 318-435-2903

David Kerns    Cell: 318-439-4844     Office: 318-435-2157

 

Section 24c Granted for Acephate in Louisiana Soybeans

Section 24c Granted for Acephate in Louisiana Soybeans published on No Comments on Section 24c Granted for Acephate in Louisiana Soybeans

This special local need label allows soybean producers to apply a maximum of  2lbs (ai/acre) of acephate  per season. The previous maximum was 1.5lbs (ai/acre)  per season.

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns, please contact:

Sebe Brown at 318-498-1283 (cell) or 318-435-2903 (office)

Dr. David Kerns at 318-439-4844 (cell) or 318-435-2157 (office)

Dr. Julien Beuzelin at 337-501-7087 (cell) or 318-473-6523 (office)

Dr. Jeff Davis at 225-747-0351 (cell) or 225-578-5618 (office)

 

Corn Leaf Aphid

Aphids in Grain Sorghum

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Recently, David Kerns and I have been receiving more calls about aphids in grain sorghum. Three species of aphids colonize grain sorghum in Louisiana – corn leaf aphid, yellow sugarcane aphid and green bug.

The corn leaf aphid is blue to grayish green in color with black cornicles (twin exhaust pipes on rear of the body). Corn leaf aphids are typically found in the whorl, and development occurs sporadically throughout the growing season. Large populations can develop on larger plants; however, their effects on the crop are often negligible. As a general practice, control of corn leaf aphid is not recommended because this insect is seldom an economic pest.

Corn Leaf Aphid
Corn Leaf Aphid: Iowa State

The yellow sugarcane aphid has a lemon yellow body with a double row of dark spots down the back and is covered with small spines. Yellow sugarcane aphids will occasionally infest grain sorghum and can cause an issue due to the injection of a toxin when feeding. Areas of intense feeding will often result in purpling of young plants or chlorotic discoloration in older plants. Yield losses are most likely to occur in seedling infestations of this insect, but high numbers infesting older sorghum shouldn’t be ignored.

 

Yellow Sugarcane Aphid
Yellow Sugarcane Aphid: Kansas State

The green bug has a bright lime green body with a dark green stripe running down the middle of the back and cornicles with black tips at the end. Green bugs typically congregate on the underside of fully expanded leaves, and infestations are rare in Louisiana. This insect is a serious threat to grain sorghum because it will inject a toxin while feeding. Large numbers are capable of reducing yields and in extreme cases will cause plant mortality. If a green bug population does develop, consider the size of the plants, growing conditions, crop maturity and presence of beneficial insects when determining if an application is warranted. Applications may be justified when larger to preboot stage sorghum is exhibiting symptoms of red spotting or yellowing of leaves prior to leaf death. In preboot to mature sorghum, an application may be justified when green bugs cause desiccation of more than two of the lowest fully expanded leaves.

 

Green Bug
Green Bug: University of Tennessee

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns, please contact:

Sebe Brown at 318-498-1283 (cell) or 318-435-2903 (office)

Dr. David Kerns at 318-439-4844 (cell) or 318-435-2157 (office)

Dr. Julien Beuzelin at 337-501-7087 (cell) or 318-473-6523 (office)

 

ULV Malathion

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I have been receiving more calls about ULV malathion and its use on cotton. Outlined below are the rules regarding the use of ULV malathion and application intervals outlined by the LDAF.

Courtesy of Bobby Simoneaux:

An ultra-low volume (ULV) malathion and a ULV pyrethroid insecticide (tank mixed) may be applied to control plant bugs in cotton only between sunrise on May 15 through sunrise on September 15 of each year, subject to the following.

1.     Applications shall be made at no less than seven day intervals at an application rate not to exceed the individual pesticide product labels and with no other dilutions or tank mixes.

2.     Each application shall be reported, in writing and within 24 hours of the application, to the appropriate Boll Weevil Eradication Program district office by the farmer, agricultural consultant or owner/operator.

3.     The report shall include the names and addresses of the farmer, agricultural consultant (if appropriate), owner/operator and applicator; the applicator’s number issued by the department; the field name or number; the number of acres treated; the name and EPA registration number of the pesticide product; and the application date and time.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the LDAF, Sebe Brown or Dr. David Kerns for more information.

Bobby Simoneaux:  225-925-3763

Sebe Brown     Cell: 318-498-1283       Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns    Cell: 318-439-4844     Office: 318-435-2157

Corn Earworms Increasing in Soybeans

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Recently, I have been receiving quite a few phone calls regarding corn earworms (CEW) moving into soybeans. Many of these populations were below the action threshold of 8 larvae (>1/2 in) per 25 sweeps and sporadically located across the northern half of the state.

Corn earworms are typically more attracted to soybeans from R2-R5 because adults are attracted to flowering beans to oviposit their eggs. Fields further along in maturity are less desirable for colonization by ear worms; however, fields should be scouted routinely so populations are not missed. Pheromone trap catches confirmed a relatively small flight, less than 50 adults, in traps at the Northeast and Macon Ridge Research Stations in the past week. Although this is not a large outbreak of corn earworms, larvae will consume flowers and small pods if populations are not kept in check. Fields that have had a previous application of a pyrethroid for stink bugs or three-cornered alfalfa hoppers will typically have greater numbers of earworms because of the elimination of natural enemies.

Pyrethroid susceptibility monitoring has indicated high levels of resistance, and pyrethroid applications may not provide effective control of these pests. However, new diamide chemistries – including Besiege, Prevathon and Belt – have demonstrated satisfactory control of these and other worm pests in soybeans.

Belt (AI: Flubendiamide) and Prevathon (AI: Chlorantraniliprole) only provide control of lepidopteran pests; Besiege (AI: Chlorantraniliprole + Lambda-cyhalothrin ) will control a broader spectrum of pests because of the inclusion of lambda-cyhalothrin. A tank mix of a pyrethroid and 0.5lbs of acephate may provide effective control on low numbers of CEW. Beware, only 1.5 lbs of acephate can be applied per acre per season in soybeans, and producers may want to save acephate for stink bug applications.

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns, please contact:

Sebe Brown at 318-498-1283 (cell) or 318-435-2903 (office)

Dr. David Kerns at 318-439-4844 (cell) or 318-435-2157 (office)

Dr. Julien Beuzelin at 337-501-7087 (cell) or 318-473-6523 (office)

Dr. Jeff Davis at 225-747-0351 (cell) or 225-578-5618 (office)

 

Kudzu Bug Adult and Nymphs

PEST ALERT: Kudzu Bugs Found in Madison Parish, Louisiana

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The kudzu bug has been found in Madison Parish, La., near Mound by consultant Lee Oliver. This is the first documented occurrence of this pest in the state of Louisiana. Please see below for more information on this pest.

Kudzu bugs, or bean plataspid, are small, oval-shaped insects native to India and China. Adults are ¼ inch in diameter and vary from brown to green in color. Kudzu bug egg clusters are oviposited in double rows, appearing as tipped over barrels, and are beige in color. Nymphs of this pest are oval-shaped, light green in color and covered in setae (hairs). Adults and immature kudzu bugs are primarily found on the stems of soybean plants using their piercing/sucking mouthparts to extract plant fluids. Kudzu bugs take approximately six weeks to complete one generation on kudzu and often complete a second generation on soybeans.

Kudzu Bug Adult and Nymphs
Kudzu Bug Adult and Nymphs: Photo by UGA

Kudzu bugs are polyphagous feeders and will feed on kudzu, wisteria, soybeans and other legumes. During the fall, large numbers of kudzu bugs seek overwintering habitats around structures including shrubs, leaf litter, and crevices around homes. Unlike most insect pests in Louisiana, kudzu bugs will congregate around window seals, doorframes and gutters and are attracted to white colored objects. Body secretions from this insect have a foul odor, stain walls and fabrics and, if handled directly, can stain the skin and cause discomfort.

Based on research from the University of Georgia, kudzu bugs appear to be more attracted to early-planted soybeans between the R2 and R3 growth stages and tend to have the largest populations in fields with neonicotinoid seed treatments. Field invasions often occur from the outer margins and gradually spread across the entire field. Damage from this insect stresses and weakens soybean plants resulting in smaller seeds and fewer pods per plant. Preliminary data from the University of Georgia and Clemson University indicate average yield losses of 18%.  This damage is often exaggerated by dry conditions. Although kudzu bugs have piercing/sucking mouth parts, this insect is primarily a stem and foliage feeder not a pod feeder. Dr. Jeremy Greene, from Clemson University, demonstrates how to sample for kudzu bugs and the amounts that can be captured using a sweep net http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-9gqL8kce4.

Large numbers of kudzu bugs captured in a sweep net. Photo by Clemson University
Large numbers of kudzu bugs captured in a sweep net. Photo by Clemson University

Kudzu bugs take weeks to migrate into soybeans and chemical control options should not be used until nymphs are detected. Research from the University of Georgia indicates that these insects are easily controlled with insecticides presently used in soybean IPM programs and require large numbers to inflict damage. Preliminary action thresholds have been set at one nymph per sweep or high numbers of adults. Research conducted by Drs. Philip Roberts and Jaye Whitaker from the University of Georgia demonstrated insecticide efficacy against kudzu bugs in soybean.

Kudzu Bug Control Options
Kudzu Bug Control Options

With the kudzu bug now in Louisiana, it is important for producers and consultants to be informed on the effects and control options for this pest.

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns please contact Sebe Brown, or Drs. Jeff Davis, David Kerns or Julien Beuzelin.

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns  Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

Dr. Julien Beuzelin Cell: 337-501-7087  Office: 318-473-6523

Dr. Jeff Davis  Cell: 225-747-0351    Office: 225-578-5618

 

 

Updated Redbanded Stink Bug Threshold in Soybeans

Updated Redbanded Stink Bug Threshold in Soybeans published on No Comments on Updated Redbanded Stink Bug Threshold in Soybeans

The LSU AgCenter has revised the redbanded stink bug threshold in soybeans from 6 per 25 sweeps to 4 per 25 sweeps. The 2013 Louisiana insect management guide has the threshold listed as 6 per 25 sweeps, please use the revised threshold of 4 per 25 sweeps when making application decisions.  The LSU AgCenter is in a transitional phase between publication times of the  insect management guide and the revised threshold will be in the 2014 edition. We are sorry for any confusion this may have caused.

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns please contact Sebe Brown, or Drs. David Kerns , Julien Beuzelin or Jeff Davis.

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns   Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

Dr. Julien Beuzelin   Cell: 337-501-7087  Office: 318-473-6523

Dr. Jeff Davis  Cell: 225-747-0351    Office: 225-578-5618

Wireworm Injury

Wireworms Prevalent This Year

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With the unusually wet, cold weather Louisiana has been experiencing this spring , soil borne insect issues are becoming increasingly evident as the field season progresses. One such issue that I looked at this week was a corn field with severe wireworm damage.

Wireworm Injury
Wireworm Injury

 

Wireworms are slender, hard bodied, wire like insects that are the immature stage of click beetles. They are shiny brown

Wireworm Injury
Wireworm Injury

in color and typically ½ inch to 1 ½ inches in length. Wireworms can injure cotton, corn and soybeans during the early stages of seedling growth. Adverse conditions such as cool temperatures and excessive moisture resulting in stalled seedling growth leaves plants more susceptible to injury.  Insecticide seed treatments will typically provide adequate protection against wireworms; however, excessive moisture may cause the insecticide to move out of the root zone leaving seedlings susceptible.  Of the three neonicotinoid insecticides available for use on agronomic seed, imidacloprid is the most water soluble at 0.61 g/l of water, followed by thiamethoxam and clothianidin at 0.41 and 0.33 g/l, respectively.  These values represent the degree of leachability but are highly dependent on soil type.

Wireworms will typically build large populations in reduced tillage, sandy fields that have not been have not been rotated (ie. corn behind corn).  Wireworm damage will often result in stunted plants, dead hearts in corn, and irregularly shaped holes that become more pronounced as the crop grows. There are no rescue treatments for wireworms and crops become less susceptible as the season progress.  Warm temperatures cause these insects to move deeper into the soil where they are no longer a threat to growing crops.

Wireworm Injury at Growing Point
Wireworm Injury at Growing Point

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns please contact Sebe Brown, or Drs. David Kerns or Julien Beuzelin.

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns   Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

Dr. Julien Beuzelin   Cell: 337-501-7087  Office: 318-473-6523

 

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