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Sorghum Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals

Sorghum Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals published on No Comments on Sorghum Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals

 

Sorghum Insecticide Formulation, Rate and PHI
Sorghum Insecticide Formulation, Rate and PHI

Beware, generics were not included in the above list, rates and formulations may be different. 

Pre-harvest intervals are given for sorghum harvested for grain not for forage. Harvest intervals may be different for sorghum used as forage.

** Lorsban 4E: Do not harvest for grain, forage, fodder, hay or silage within 30 days after application of 1 pint of Lorsban 4E per acre or within 60 days after application of rates above 1 pint per acre.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact:

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns  Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

Dr. Julien Beuzelin Cell: 337-501-7087  Office: 318-473-6523

Cotton Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals

Cotton Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals published on No Comments on Cotton Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals
Cotton Insecticide Formulation, Rate and PHI
Cotton Insecticide Formulation, Rate and PHI

Beware, generics were not included in the above list, rates and formulations may be different. 

(**) Curacron 8E: Do not apply Curacron 8E within 14 days of harvest when application is made in a water carrier or within 30 days of harvest when application is made in an oil carrier. 

If you have any questions or concerns please contact:

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns  Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

 

Soybean Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals

Soybean Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals published on 2 Comments on Soybean Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Intervals
Soybean Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Interval
Soybean Insecticide Formulation, Rate and Pre-harvest Interval

Beware, generics were not included in the above list, rates and formulations may be different. 

If you have any questions or concerns please contact:

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. Jeff Davis  Cell: 225-747-0351    Office: 225-578-5618

Dr. David Kerns  Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

Dr. Julien Beuzelin Cell: 337-501-7087  Office: 318-473-6523

Redbanded stink bug nymph

Soybean Loopers and Redbanded Stink bugs in Soybeans

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Lately I have been receiving more calls about soybean loopers and redbanded stink bugs in late soybeans. Soybean loopers are late season pests that usually do not arrive in large numbers until August. These defoliating insects are often intensified by the use of broad-spectrum insecticides for control of three-cornered alfalfa hoppers and redbanded stink bugs. These applications effectively sterilize soybean fields; this often includes natural enemies which can keep soybean looper populations in check.  The threshold for soybean loopers in Louisiana soybeans is 8 worms ½ inch or longer per row foot or 150 worms in 100 sweeps.

Soybean looper immature
Soybean Looper: Photo by LSU AgCenter

Soybean loopers have developed resistance to many insecticide chemistries and effective control measures are primarily limited to lepidopteran specific insecticides. However, the LSU AgCenter Soybean Entomology Lab (under the direction of Dr. Jeff Davis) has documented soybean looper insecticide resistance to methoxyfenozide (Intrepid 2F) in areas of North and South Louisiana. Rates of Intrepid below 6 oz/acre and prophylactic applications, with a fungicide, before the presence of loopers are not recommended. Belt (2-3 oz/acre) and Steward (5.6-11.3 oz/acre) are effective in controlling soybean looper populations with Belt providing residual efficacy of 14 days or more depending on application volume and rate.

Redbanded stink bugs have become the dominant stink bugs species in Louisiana

Redbanded stink bug adult
Redbanded Stink bug Adult: Photo by LSU AgCenter

soybeans. Redbanded stink bugs are part of a complex of pod feeders that feed directly on soybean seeds reducing seed size, quality and yield. This pest is more difficult to control than other stink bug species often requiring 3-5 insecticide applications. Pyrethroid efficacy against redbanded stink bugs has declined in recent years resulting in the use of tank mixes and premix applications. The threshold for redbanded stink bugs in Louisiana soybeans is 24 bugs in 100 sweeps. Endigo and Leverage 360 have demonstrated satisfactory control of redbanded stink bugs as well as tank mixes of acephate plus a pyrethroid. Beware only 1.5 lbs of acephate can be applied per crop per season for soybeans. Redbanded stink bugs are strong fliers and re-colonization after an insecticide treatment may occur quickly.

Redbanded stink bug nymph
Redbanded Stink bug Nymph: Photo by LSU AgCenter

Routine scouting is required for both of these insects in soybeans. The flighty nature of redbanded stink bugs and large populations of soybean loopers can result in significant yield losses if populations are allowed to increase unchecked.

For more information or if you have any questions or concerns please contact Sebe Brown, or Drs. Jeff Davis, David Kerns or Julien Beuzelin.

Sebe Brown   Cell: 318-498-1283   Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. Jeff Davis  Cell: 225-747-0351    Office: 225-578-5618

Dr. David Kerns  Cell: 318-439-4844    Office: 318-435-2157

Dr. Julien Beuzelin Cell: 337-501-7087  Office: 318-473-6523

ULV Malathion

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I have been receiving more calls about ULV malathion and its use on cotton. Outlined below are the rules regarding the use of ULV malathion and application intervals outlined by the LDAF.

Courtesy of Bobby Simoneaux:

An ultra-low volume (ULV) malathion and a ULV pyrethroid insecticide (tank mixed) may be applied to control plant bugs in cotton only between sunrise on May 15 through sunrise on September 15 of each year, subject to the following.

1.     Applications shall be made at no less than seven day intervals at an application rate not to exceed the individual pesticide product labels and with no other dilutions or tank mixes.

2.     Each application shall be reported, in writing and within 24 hours of the application, to the appropriate Boll Weevil Eradication Program district office by the farmer, agricultural consultant or owner/operator.

3.     The report shall include the names and addresses of the farmer, agricultural consultant (if appropriate), owner/operator and applicator; the applicator’s number issued by the department; the field name or number; the number of acres treated; the name and EPA registration number of the pesticide product; and the application date and time.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the LDAF, Sebe Brown or Dr. David Kerns for more information.

Bobby Simoneaux:  225-925-3763

Sebe Brown     Cell: 318-498-1283       Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns    Cell: 318-439-4844     Office: 318-435-2157

Kudzu Bug Adult

PEST ALERT: Kudzu Bugs Found in Vicksburg, Mississippi

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PEST ALERT:The Kudzu Bug (Bean Plataspid) has been found in Vicksburg, Mississippi. This is an invasive soybean pest that has not been detected in Louisiana. The Kudzu Bug can cause significant injury to soybeans and migration from Kudzu is common. If this insect is found, or for more information, please contact the LSU AgCenter. Below is contact information for LSU AgCenter entomologists and LDAF personnel.

Kudzu bugs on soybeans
Kudzu bugs on soybeans: Photo by J. Greene

Jeffrey A. Davis: LSU AgCenter Assistant Professor-Research Soybean Entomologist and Soybean IPM

Kudzu Bug Adult
Kudzu Bug Adult

Office: 225-578-5618   Cell: 225-747-0351  jeffdavis@agcenter.lsu.edu

David Kerns: LSU AgCenter Associate Professor- Macon Ridge

Office: 319-435-2157       Cell: 318-439-4844   dkerns@agcenter.lsu.edu

Julien Beuzelin: LSU AgCenter Assistant Professor-Field Crops Insect Ecology & Pest Managment

Office: 318-473-6523         Cell: 337-501-7087     jbeuzelin@agcenter.lsu.edu

Sebe Brown: LSU AgCenter Extension Entomologist Northeast Region

Cell: 318-498-1283  sbrown@agcenter.lsu.edu

Richard Miller: LDAF Administrative Coordinator Quarantine Programs  Office: 225-952-8053

Spider mite injury to cotton leaf

Spider Mite Control Options

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Dr. David Kerns and I have been receiving more phone calls regarding spider mites in cotton.  Mite problems are exacerbated by hot, dry weather and applications of broad-spectrum insecticides for early season pests.

Do not wait for spider mite treatments in cotton if populations are found scattered throughout the field or if mites are moving in from field borders. When making applications, correct nozzles and high water volumes are essential for adequate coverage and application rates should reflect mite severity.

Miticide application rates should be adjusted for population severity with higher rates used for more severe infestations. Some control options available for spider mite control include Oberon, Portal, Abamectin, Athena and Zeal. Below is a brief description of each product and recommended use.

Oberon, a slower acting miticide, may to take 5-7 days before mortality is observed in the field.

Spider mite injury to cotton leaf
Spider mite injury to cotton leaf: Photo by David Kerns

Portal has given satisfactory results when applied at 16-20 oz/acre, lower rates in large cotton may not give complete control. Portal is a contact miticide but one should still allow 5-7 days to assess effectiveness.

Abamectin has been widely used for mite control across the Northeast region with multiple applications required for control of severe infestations. However, producers and consultants should consider rotating chemistries on fields that have had numerous abamectin applications for resistance management and if efficacy has decreased.

If mixed populations of bollworms and mites are in a field, Athena a premix of bifenthrin and abamectin, is another available control option.  Ten ounces of Athena is equivalent to 3.8 ounces of bifenthrin 2E and 7.5 ounces of abamectin. For effective bollworm control, Athena should be supplemented with more bifenthrin and ½ lb of acephate should be added to increase efficacy on any tarnished plant bugs and pyrethroid tolerant worms.

Zeal is one of our most effective options for controlling spider mites in cotton. Because we are limited to 1 application of Zeal per season, we usually prefer to save our Zeal shot for more troublesome mite problems.

If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact Sebe Brown or Dr. David Kerns for more information.

Sebe Brown     Cell: 318-498-1283       Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns    Cell: 318-439-4844     Office: 318-435-2157

rice strain fall armyworm on soybean

Rice-Grass Strain of Fall Armyworm in Soybeans

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I have been receiving phone calls regarding fall armyworms moving into late planted soybeans.  Most of these calls come after a producer has applied a Round up application to control grasses that may have been missed with previous applications. Fall armyworms moving off of these grass hosts are the “grass or rice strain” armyworms preferring grass hosts over legumes.

rice strain fall armyworm on soybean
T    Rice Strain of Fall Armyworm in Soybeans: Photo by Gus Lorenz

The problem is often exaggerated by the size of fall armyworm larvae moving off of grass into soybeans with large, late, instar worms causing severe foliage loss in a short time period.  Many lepidopteran insects will consume more foliage in the last 3 to 4 days of development than throughout their entire life cycle as a caterpillar. This means that once the grass hosts have been removed by a herbicide application, soybeans can experience severe defoliation from migrating armyworms.

Thus, grassy fields should be scouted before an herbicide application is applied. If fall armyworms are found, a pyrethroid can be added to effectively control these insects before they move into beans.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact Sebe Brown or Dr. David Kerns for more information.

Sebe Brown         Cell: 318-498-1283        Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns          Cell: 318-439-4844        Office: 318-435-2157

 

Sorghum midge damage Photo by LSU agcenter

Sorghum Midge in Northeast Louisiana Sorghum

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I have received a few phone calls regarding sorghum midge in Northeast Louisiana.  Sorghum midge is small insect (1/8 inch or smaller) that has dark wings and an orange body.  The sorghum midge is primarily found on grain sorghum and Johnson grass with both hosts playing an important role in overwintering and reproduction.  Adult midges will emerge in the spring and often complete two generations on Johnson grass before moving into grain sorghum.

Sorghum midge females may lay as many as 50 eggs in the flowering spikelets of sorghum with resulting damage occuring during bloom. The developing larvae feed on fertilized grain ovaries preventing kernel development. Affected sorghum heads will have blanked or irregular grain patterns. Early planted sorghum will often have lower populations of sorghum midge than later plantings. Promoting crop uniformity will also help reduce the instance and severity of sorghum midge.  Johnson grass should be destroyed in and around field borders with all crop residue destroyed after sorghum harvest.

Sorghum midge damage Photo by LSU agcenter
Sorghum midge damage: Photo by LSU Agcenter

Scouting for sorghum midge can be difficult, especially in windy conditions. Additionally, sorghum midge only attack flowering sorghum, which occurs during the morning. Scouting sorghum for midge after 1 pm is almost always ineffective.  Also, sorghum midge adults live only 1 day so each day is a new brood of midge. Thus, flowering sorghum should be scouted daily if possible, twice weekly at minimum. Because midge are weak flyers, infestations will typically begin along field borders and spread downwind from alternative hosts (Johnson grass).

Sorghum midge adult Photo by Jerry Lenhard
Sorghum midge adult:Photo by Jerry Lenhard

The simplest and most efficient way to scout for sorghum midges is to carefully inspect all sides of randomly selected flowering grain heads. Handle grain heads carefully during inspection to avoid disturbing adult sorghum midges, and counting the adults present. Other sampling methods can be used, such as placing a clear plastic bag or jar over the sorghum grain head to trap adults. Scouting should begin once the plants are averaging 25-30% bloom.

The threshold for sorghum midge in Louisiana is 1 or more midge per head. Because new unprotected blooms emerge every day, additional insecticide applications at 5-7 day intervals may be needed. There are a number of pyrethoids that are effective towards sorghum midge as well as Lorsban/chlorpyrifos and Lannate.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact Sebe Brown or Dr. David Kerns for more information.

Sebe Brown      Cell: 318-498-1283        Office: 318-435-2903

Dr. David Kerns        Cell: 318-439-4844         Office: 318-435-2157

Year of the Pigweed

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By Dr. Daniel Stephenson, LSU AgCenter Weed Scientist

 

We have all seen or heard about the tremendous troubles glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth is causing producers in Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, and other states as well as the steps they have to take to manage it.  Applications of residual herbicides preplant, preemergence, early-postemergence, postemergence-directed, and post-harvest in addition to hand-hoeing have been become a requirement.  In Louisiana, the LSU AgCenter confirmed the presence of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in 2010.  Prior to 2012, we knew it was primarily located in Concordia, Madison, and Tensas Parishes.

Unfortunately, Louisiana is experiencing an explosion of instances where glyphosate is not controlling Palmer amaranth in 2012.  Whether I have personally seen locations or had numerous calls from producers, consultants, or industry representatives telling me about the failures, the problem is ballooning.  Locations where I have received calls in 2012 include Northeast, Northwest, Central, and South-central Louisiana, so it isn’t just a problem for a few Mississippi River parishes anymore.

Although corn weed control in-crop is over, producers need to utilize post-harvest weed management techniques.  Considering the early corn crop Louisiana will have this year, we will be left with many months of excellent growing conditions for Palmer amaranth and all other weedy species.  Post-harvest weed management techniques include multiple tillage operations, applications of a non-selective herbicide plus a residual herbicide, or a combination of both tillage and herbicides.  The goal is to prevent weeds from producing seed.  Another consideration is sanitation during and after crop harvest.  Harvesting and tillage equipment are excellent tools for spreading weed seed.  All equipment should be thoroughly cleaned to remove weed seed before moving to the next field.

Hand removal of weeds that escaped herbicide applications is very important also.  For example, a soybean field has lapped and you spot a couple of pigweeds still growing out in the field.  It is not that difficult to walk out in the field, pull them up, take them out of the field, and burn them.  The old saying is “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”.  With potentially glyphosate-resistant weeds, prevention is worth much more than a pound.

LSU AgCenter weed scientists feared that we’d have a year were pigweed populations exploded.  Well, 2012 is that year!  If you suspect a problem, call your local county agent for help and remove the weeds from your field.  Don’t just ignore this issue.  It must be taken seriously.